CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Sun May 09, 2010 10:30 am

CAMERA'S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

Exhibitor Has a Clever Advertising Medium

An accident insurance policy issued with every ticket of admission; that was the stunt employed by the Hippodrome at York, Pa., during its engagement of the Harold Lloyd feature comedy “Safety Last.” The policy indemnified the holder in the sum of $50. The unusual practice of a theatre insuring every member of its audience against accident excited widespread and profitable comment. Despite the apparent financial risk assumed by the Hippodrome, its chance of sustaining any loss, under the plan followed, was practically nil.
In its formal and legal phases the document was a bona-fide policy, hearing the organizational inscription of the Maryland Casualty Company on its face, and was issued by a local bond insurance agency, which co-operated with the Hippodrome in staging the stunt. Nothing of the formal or legal elements, commonly associated with documents of this kind, was omitted that would lend an impressive note to the arrangement, even the signatures of the president and secretary of the casualty company being duly recorded in their proper places in the document.
The policy was so drafted as to afford a maximum of publicity for the theatre and “Safety Last.” The feature stipulation of the document was was cleverly retained to the final clause, thereby augmenting the interest and suspense that the policy would naturally hold for its reader. The final clauses revealed the contingencies upon which the payment of the indemnity depended. It was expressly stipulated at this point that “This policy is hereby limited to cover only the accidental cr5acking of a rib, directly and solely from laughter while viewing the cinema, Harold Lloyd in 'Safety Last,' as above stated, anything herein to the contrary notwithstanding.”
The Hippodrome completed its run without any casualties other than temporary attacks of incipient hysteria on the part of its woman patrons.
Another effective stunt designed exclusively for the ladies was the presentation to the woman patrons of the Hippodrome of a sealed envelope, across the face of which was printed, “Contents for Ladies Only.” The enclosures comprised a safety pin, attached to a card on which appeared the advice, “Use This for Safety First When You laugh and Roar at Harold Lloyd in 'Safety Last' “and a dainty handkerchief, which the feminine members of the audience were recommended to use in drying their tears of laughter.

(Camera Vol. 6 No. 24 pg. 9)

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I can just picture a young William Castle sitting in the back row at the Hippodrome taking notes on the audience reactions to all this.

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Mon May 10, 2010 7:48 am

CAMERA'S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

Star's Recovery Is Welcome News

James Kirkwood, Goldwyn player, who was severely injured four weeks ago when he was thrown from his horse in the Beverly Hills riding ring, left his bed for the first time last week. With his pretty wife, known professionally as Lila Lee, he visited the Goldwyn studios at Culver City.
At the time of his injury he was playing the leading role in King Vidor's “Wild Oranges.” Because of the serious nature of his injury it was deemed advisable to place Frank Mayo in the part which Kirkwood had been playing. Physicians kept the fact from him, and it was not until yesterday that he learned another had been selected.
Kirkwood's rapid recovery is considered remarkable in medical circles. Very few persons have been known to recover from a basal fracture of the skull. It will be several weeks before the injured actor has regained his strength sufficiently to resume his work.

(Camera Vol. 6 No. 24 pg. 10)
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Tue May 11, 2010 11:14 am

CAMERA'S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

First National Is to Release Output

Associated First National Pictures, Inc., is to distribute the film output of Principal Pictures Corporation.
The productions to reach the screen through this medium include “The Meanest man in the World,” George M. Cohan's famous stage success and the first of the Harold Bell Wright features., “When a Man's a Man.”
“The Meanest Man in the World,” which was made at the United Studios, under the direction of Eddie Cline, boasts an all-star cast, headed by Bert Lytell, Blanche Sweet, Bryant Washburn and a dozen other players of note.
“When a Man's a Man' is one of Harold Bell Wright's most popular stories of the great outdoors. Its unusually talented cast includes John Bowers, Marguerite de la Motte and Robert Frazer.
With the completion of these distributing arrangements Sol Lesser, president of Principal pictures, leaves for Europe to confer with First National executives relative to foreign plans; Mike Rosenberg, secretary, came to Los Angeles, to start immediately on the first Baby Peggy production with the termination of her Universal contract, and Irving M. Lesser, vice-president, remained in New York to look after interests.

(Camera Vol. 6 No. 24 pg. 12)

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More on what was going on with Principal Pictures at this time. Interesting that, even though Langdon had been getting plenty of mention in their write-ups in CAMERA just a couple of weeks before, there is nary a mention of him here.

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Mon May 17, 2010 8:19 am

From “U” to You by Will C. Murphy

Baby Peggy's contract with the Century Film Company and the agreement under which she is being starred in elaborate multiple reel productions made jointly by Century and the Universal pictures Corporation, will not be completed until October 31st. This is the statement of Julius and Abe Stern, of the Century.
Baby Peggy special comedies made by Century and awaiting release, include several elaborately made short reel subjects. Two Universal-Jewel specials produced by Julius and Abe Stern in conjunction with Universal and completed are “Whose Baby Are You?” and “The Burglar's Kid.”
“The Right to Love” is the current production, which will be finished before the end of Baby Peggy's contract. For this picture Julius Stern and the executives of Universal sought the highest type of talent and obtained Robert Ellis, Elinor Faire, Winifrid Bryson of “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” James Corrigan, Ned Sparks, Anna Hernandez, Buddy Messinger, Eva Thatcher and others.

(Camera Vol. 6 No. 24 pg. 20)

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Even as Sol Lesser and Principal Pictures made their announcements regarding their signing of Baby Peggy and attendant plans for her , the Stern Bros. and Universal made sure they would get their full use out of her time remaining under contract to them (and any publicity they could get along the way).
I just picked up one of her late Universal-Jewel features from Grapevine ("The Family Secret"-1924) and am looking forward to giving it a look-see.

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Wed May 19, 2010 7:40 am

From “U” to You by Will C. Murphy

Rex Taylor, long associated with Mack Sennett and who is one of the best known scenarists in the film colony, has been assigned by Bernard McConville, supervising editor at Universal City, to write the continuity of “Love Insurance.”
The story is an adaptation of the novel of the same name by Earl Derr Biggers and will be used as Reginald Denny's next starring vehicle. It is a dramatic love story, with a comedy twist.
Filming will be completed in few weeks on Denny's present picture, “There He Goes,” adapted from Byron Morgan's story of the same name.

(Camera Vol. 6 No. 24 pg. 20)
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Mon May 24, 2010 11:43 am

Caldwell Signs Up With Selznick Corp.

Director Fred Caldwell, producer of “Night Life in Hollywood,” has just returned from New York City, where he concluded a releasing contract with the Selznick Picture Corporation to give international distribution to his entire output of feature comedies for the year, each to have a distinct Hollywood theme. The contract was secured on merit of productions which Mr.Caldwell has completed from original stories from the pen of J. Stewart Woodhouse, which he screened in New York. The first four pictures which will start releases November 1st, are “The Elite of Hollywood,” “The Cream of Hollywood,” “The Bishop of Hollywood,” and The Shiek of Hollywood.” These feature comedies include in their cast such well known players as Chester Conklin, Muriel Reynolds, Victor Potel, Gale Henry, Charles Mack, Alice Howell, Raymond Cannon, Violet Schram and Charles Dale.
Production will be resumed immediately in furtherance of contract.

(Camera Vol. 6 No. 24 pg. 21)

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I notice that these Fred Caldwell comedies are repeatedly referred to as features in this article although I had thought that they were short subjects. Anyone run across anything confirming their actual lengths? How about any reviews?

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Steve Massa » Mon May 24, 2010 4:31 pm

Hi Joe
They were 2 reelers. Here's a listing for the series from the 4/1923 Motion Picture News Booking Guide (pg. 82):

"HOLLYWOOD COMEDIES. Produced by L.K.C. Productions. Distributed by Selznick Distributing Corp. Starring Alice Howell & Chester Conklin. Directed by Fred Caldwell. Length, 2 reels.
Bishop of Hollywood, The. Released February 15, 1924
Cream of Hollywood, The. Released January 15, 1924
Elite of Hollywood, The. Released November 15, 1923
Sheik of Hollywood, The. Released December 15, 1923."

I've seen THE SHEIK OF HOLLYWOOD which stars Caldwell, Gale Henry and Victor Potel. It wasn't so hot, but another I saw, which the BFI calls A DAY IN HOLLYWOOD, was much better. This one had Gale Henry, Hank Mann, and Buddy the dog. There was some good business, and Gale & Hank worked well together. Not sure what the orginal title is on this one as I've never found any reviews with synopsis on these. I know it wasn't THE ELITE OF HOLLYWOOD as we have some photos from that one at the Library for the Performing Arts and it stars Alice Howell and Victor Potel. Brent Walker told me that he saw one on nitrate at UCLA that was labeled OIL WELL COMEDY. It starred Alice Howell, so it might be THE ELITE OF HOLLYWOOD.

I've also seen the Caldwell feature, NIGHT LIFE IN HOLLYWOOD, that's referred to at the top of the item. It's about a hick who comes to Hollywood and goes to the homes of his favorite stars. It's pretty much a glorified travelogue, but Gale Henry has some funny moments.
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Richard M Roberts » Wed May 26, 2010 5:12 am

Steve Massa wrote:Hi Joe
They were 2 reelers. Here's a listing for the series from the 4/1923 Motion Picture News Booking Guide (pg. 82):

"HOLLYWOOD COMEDIES. Produced by L.K.C. Productions. Distributed by Selznick Distributing Corp. Starring Alice Howell & Chester Conklin. Directed by Fred Caldwell. Length, 2 reels.
Bishop of Hollywood, The. Released February 15, 1924
Cream of Hollywood, The. Released January 15, 1924
Elite of Hollywood, The. Released November 15, 1923
Sheik of Hollywood, The. Released December 15, 1923."

I've seen THE SHEIK OF HOLLYWOOD which stars Caldwell, Gale Henry and Victor Potel. It wasn't so hot, but another I saw, which the BFI calls A DAY IN HOLLYWOOD, was much better. This one had Gale Henry, Hank Mann, and Buddy the dog. There was some good business, and Gale & Hank worked well together. Not sure what the orginal title is on this one as I've never found any reviews with synopsis on these. I know it wasn't THE ELITE OF HOLLYWOOD as we have some photos from that one at the Library for the Performing Arts and it stars Alice Howell and Victor Potel. Brent Walker told me that he saw one on nitrate at UCLA that was labeled OIL WELL COMEDY. It starred Alice Howell, so it might be THE ELITE OF HOLLYWOOD.

I've also seen the Caldwell feature, NIGHT LIFE IN HOLLYWOOD, that's referred to at the top of the item. It's about a hick who comes to Hollywood and goes to the homes of his favorite stars. It's pretty much a glorified travelogue, but Gale Henry has some funny moments.



The thing I remember about the Caldwell short we saw at UCLA was that Howell's hair was not her standard frizz job, and Potel was definitely in it. It was also better then THE SHEIK OF HOLLYWOOD,and had a stronger story. All of these Fred Caldwell films smack of vanity productions, but he definitely could afford some real comedy talent to back him up in them.

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Steve Massa » Wed May 26, 2010 8:46 am

Richard
In the photos we have from THE ELITE OF HOLLYWOOD Alice has a nicely bobbed 20s style hair-do, and there seems to be some business that involves shooting a movie on somebody's front lawn. Does that sound at all like the UCLA film?

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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, Sept. 29, 1923

Postby Richard M Roberts » Wed May 26, 2010 3:34 pm

Steve Massa wrote:Richard
In the photos we have from THE ELITE OF HOLLYWOOD Alice has a nicely bobbed 20s style hair-do, and there seems to be some business that involves shooting a movie on somebody's front lawn. Does that sound at all like the UCLA film?

Steve



It do.

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